! Hunting & Fishing Licenses | Boat Registration Renewal
 

Exotic Animals Established in Alabama

Some Exotic Animals Established in Alabama

The terms exotic* species, introduced species, and nonindigenous species describe animal species that have been brought to a new location by man, either on purpose or by accident, and have become established. 

Exotic fish in (at least some basins of) Alabama include:
Blueback Herring are now in Smith Lake in the upper Black Warrior basin.
Goldfish may have come from releases of pets or from released bait.
Grass Carp have been stocked to control aquatic weeds in reservoirs and ponds.
Red Shiner may have come from bait introductions and are known to hybridize with native minnows.
Carp were stocked early in our country's history because this was a popular fish to catch in Europe.
Silver Carp may have been introduced from accidental releases from aquaculture.
Bighead Carp may have been introduced from accidental releases from aquaculture.
Fathead Minnow are from bait use.
Bigmouth Buffalo are not indigenous to the Cahaba River.
Flathead Catfish are not indigenous to the Conecuh River and some other coastal streams.
White Catfish were stocked into Alabama State Public Fishing Lakes.
muskellunge were stocked by ADCNR, but may not have a viable population in Alabama anymore.
Rainbow Trout are regularly stocked in the Sipsey Fork below Smith Lake and come into Alabama from Georgia stockings of the East Fork of the Little River.
Brown Trout
Brook Stickleback may have been accidently introduced from bait.
Redbreast Sunfish are native to the Chattahoochee basin and possibly Coosa and Tallapoosa.
Smallmouth Bass are native in the Tennessee basin.
Yellow Perch are native in the Mobile Delta.

Other exotic aquatic animals include:
Asiatic Mussel
Zebra Mussel
Quagga Mussels
Apple Snails have probably been released from people's aquaria.

Exotic mammals include:
fallow deer
wild hogs
nutria
black rat
Norway rat
house mouse

Exotic birds, amphibians and reptiles in Alabama include:
rock dove (pigeon),
Eurasian collard doves
European starlings
English sparrows
greenhouse frog
Ouachita map turtle
Texas Horned Lizard
Mediterranean house gecko
Indo-Pacific gecko
brown anole

(*Some use the term exotics for species from other countries.)

Read to find out what you can do to prevent the spread of aquatic nuisance species.

It shall be unlawful to intentionally stock or release any fish, mussel, snail, crayfish or their embryos including bait fish into the public waters of Alabama under the jurisdiction of the Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries as provided in Rule 220-2-.42 except those waters from which it came without the written permission of a designated employee of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources authorized by the Director of the Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries to issue such permit. The provisions of this rule shall not apply to the incidental release of bait into the water during the normal process of fishing.


Official Web site of Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources
©2008 Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources   |   64 N. Union Street, Suite 468 - Montgomery, Alabama 36130