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FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Hunting license questions

At what age must I purchase a hunting or fishing license? At 16 years of age.

I’m 65 years of age and a resident of Alabama. Must I purchase a hunting or fishing license? No. Residents of Alabama 65 years of age and older are not required to purchase a license.

Must I purchase a federal migratory bird hunting stamp in addition to a state duck stamp to waterfowl hunt? Yes, all persons 16 years of age and older are required to purchase a federal duck stamp when hunting migratory waterfowl.

I am a resident of Alabama. Must I purchase a hunting license to hunt on lands I own in Alabama? No, residents of Alabama are not required to purchase a hunting license to hunt on property they own.

I am a non-resident but own land in Alabama. Must I purchase a hunting license to hunt on this property? Yes, you are required to purchase a non-resident hunting license.

I am a non-resident 67 years of age. Must I purchase a hunting license to hunt in Alabama? Yes. Non-resident persons 16 years of age and older must first purchase a hunting license before hunting in Alabama.

I’m a non-resident but stationed in Alabama with the military. Must I purchase a hunting/fishing license? Yes, but you are allowed to purchase a resident hunting and/or fishing license.

I’m active duty military and a resident of Alabama home on leave. Must I purchase a hunting/fishing license? No, residents on active duty home on leave may hunt and fish without license (must have proof of leave in possession).

Does Alabama have a disabled hunting license? No, Alabama does not have a disabled hunting license.

Fishing license questions

Is a fishing license required to fish private lakes or ponds? No. Fishing licenses are only required to fish in public waters.

Is there a special fishing license for disabled persons? Yes. Persons that are totally disabled and have been a resident of Alabama for six months may obtain this license for $1.00. Applications for this license can be obtained from the Probate Judge or License Commissioner in the county in which they reside.

Can I fish from my pier in public waters without a fishing license? No, residents of Alabama, 16 to 65 years of age, must first purchase a fishing license before fishing in any of the public waters of Alabama.

I am 67 years of age and a non-resident. Must I purchase a fishing license to fish the public waters of Alabama? Yes. Non-residents 16 years of age and older must first purchase a fishing license before fishing the public waters of Alabama.

I’m a non-resident but stationed in Alabama with the military. Must I purchase a hunting/fishing license? Yes, but you are allowed to purchase a resident hunting and/or fishing license.

I’m active duty military and a resident of Alabama home on leave. Must I purchase a hunting/fishing license? No, residents on active duty home on leave may hunt and fish without license (must have proof of leave in possession).

Special Disabled Archery Permit

What are the requirements for a person to be issued a Special Disabled Archery permit? A person must have a permanent physical impairment that prevents them from being able to draw or hold a bow with a minimum peak tension of 35 pounds. This permit would allow a person to utilize a device that will hold a long bow, recurve bow or compound bow at full draw.

How do I obtain this permit? To obtain this permit your medical doctor must write a short letter that contains the following information:

  • Your name and address and that you are a patient of the doctor.
  • That you have a permanent physical impairment.
  • Briefly describe this impairment.
  • A statement that due to this permanent physical impairment you are unable to draw or hold a bow with a minimum peak tension of 35 pounds.
  • Your medical doctor must sign the letter.
  • Letter should be mailed to W.A.F.F., 64 N. Union St., Room 559, Montgomery, AL 36104.

General Questions

I have lost my hunter education certification card. Where can I get a replacement? You can print a replacement card here.

I have questions about Alabama's laws and regualtions pertaining to hunting by the aid of bait.

The following is an explanation of the statutes and regulations that pertain to baiting, feeding, and hunting.

 

 

I. The Law

Section 9-11-244 prohibits the baiting, feeding and simultaneous hunting of protected game animals and birds to the extent that the feed material constitutes a lure, attraction or enticement to, on or over the area being hunted.

Regulation 220-2-.11(7), further establishes a ten (10) day waiting period after feed has been removed before the area may be hunted.

 

II. Elements for Determining an Offense

Section 9-11-244 establishes several elements of the offense. These elements are; (1) the hunted species must be a protected game species as defined by Regulation; (2) the feed or bait material must be attractive to the hunted species. For example, corn is attractive to doves, hickory nuts are not. It would also have to be placed in such a manner as to be accessible and attractive to the species; (3) the feed or bait must attract the species to, on, or over the area where the hunter is located. The term "area" in this context is that geographic space, including the air space above, within which the hunter is physically capable of harvesting the bird or animal. Area in this sense will vary depending on visibility, weaponry, natural or man-made barriers, vegetation, terrain and distance; and (4) it must  be established is that the hunter knew or reasonably should have known that the area was baited. The burden of proof is upon the State to prove all these elements of the offense.

 

 

III. Supplemental Feeding

Neither Section 9-11-244, 9-11-245 or Regulation 220-2-.11 addresses the issue of

supplemental feeding as it relates to hunting on a specific piece of property. Therefore,

simultaneous hunting and feeding on a specific property, regardless of the size of the

property or the number of feeding locations, is not, in and of itself, illegal. Only if the

hunting and feeding satisfies all the elements of baiting previously stated does it become illegal.

 

IV. Summary

To evaluate a particular situation one must consider the totality of the circumstances, such as distance, terrain, vegetation, visibility, natural or man-made barriers, weaponry, the species being hunted and the hunter’s knowledge of the bait. No one standard will ensure that the legislative intent is fulfilled and that the law is applied fairly and reasonably. The vast majority of bait cases are made where the hunter and the bait are all well within the area being hunted. These are certainly the most flagrant cases. However, innocence must be presumed, unless it can be proven otherwise based on the totality of the above stated circumstances.

 

V. Frequently asked questions:

 

Q: Can I put out supplemental feed and hunt deer on my property during the hunting season?

A: Yes you may, if you can do so without the feed being a lure or attraction to, on or over the area (see definition) being hunted. Certainly you should not be within sight or shot of the feed or the area around the feed, or of any well defined trail or pathway to the feed.

 

Q: What would be your recommendation about feeding during the hunting season?

A: While it is not expressly prohibited, we do not recommend feeding during the hunting season for the following reasons:

1) You will have to sacrifice some portion of your acreage that you have available for hunting.

2) You may not be able to direct or control the actions of other hunters who may,

accidentally or intentionally, hunt the area affected by the feed.

3) When an officer locates a feeding area, regular, unannounced monitoring will be required to determine if the feeding area is being hunted illegally. This demands an additional expenditure of your hunting and fishing license fees which could be used enforcing other serious offenses such as hunting at night, hunting from public roads, and hunting without permission.

4) From a biological standpoint supplemental feeding is not a recommended practice. However, feeding only during the closed season (8 ½ months) would have no legal impact on your hunting. This covers the antler development period, the gestation and fawning period and the time of year when native foods are poorest and in shortest supply (late winter and late summer).

5) Supplemental feeding can increase risks for the spread of communicable diseases. Increased periods of supplemental feeding increase the time that animals are exposed to concentrations of potentially diseased infected animals.

6) Established food plots are legal to hunt and provide a low maintenance, reliable source of supplemental nutrition over a longer period of time and provide a multitude of other benefits to wildlife.

 

Q: Am I responsible for bait or feed that may be placed by someone else?

A: Only if it can be established that you knew, or reasonably should have known it was there. In Phillips v. State, the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that proving “actual guilty knowledge” is not required. However, it also ruled that it was reasonable to expect the hunter to clear the area such that with a “reasonable investigation” the hunter could have discovered the bait. Generally, it is not reasonable to expect a hunter to know what is placed on an adjoining landowner where he/she has no access.

 

Q: What should I do to determine if a property is baited when I am invited to hunt on another’s property?

A: First, ask the landowner or person responsible for the property before you go hunting. Also, you should pay attention to your surroundings and investigate anything that looks out of place, such as an obvious feeder, grain in an area where no crops are grown, grain of one type in an area where another type is grown or unusually high wildlife activity (scratching, tracks, etc.) in your location.

 

If you have more questions, please contact the Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division, Law Enforcement Section, or your nearest District office.