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2010 Brent Elementary & Centreville Middle School

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 Brent Elementary and Centreville Middle School Students Enjoy Creek Kids at Tannehill September 23, 2010

Sport Fish Restoration

  Mrs.Morrision answers questions concerning two types of pollution found in the watershed, non-point and point-source pollution.


Students spray water onto a watershed model demonstrating how water travels on land carrying soil and other contaminants into a creek.

 
Students walk through a spring at Tannehill. Springs in  a watershed supply water to creeks and to the animals living there.
 
Fisheries Chief Mr. Stan Cook (in green) observes students in a spring at Tannehill.
"Look! I see a fish in the creek." Students learn about and observe vertebrates from a bridge at Tannehill.
 "Look! I see a crayfish swimming in the creek." Students learn about and observe macroinvertebrates from a bridge at Tannehill.
 
Mr. Jackson explains to students the need for clean water in an ecosystem. An ecosystem includes people, aquatic animals, and everything living in a watershed. 


Mr.Jackson points out abiotic and biotic factors affecting aquatic animals living in a watershed.

 
"Cool! I see snails," says a student. Snails are macroinvertebrates and can be observed on creek rocks at Tannehill.

"Wow! I see mussels," replied a student. In order to live in a watershed, both snails and mussels need clean water .

A student seines fish with Mr. Jackson. A Fisheries Biologist use seines to collect fish.
 
Students identify fish caught during their trip at Tannehill.
 
Students prepare to collect aquatic insects. Aquatic insects are part of the food web and fish  living in the creek rely on them.
Students wait for further instruction on how to collect aquatic insects from the creek.
 
A student replied, "That' is a weird looking water bug."
  Aquatic insects are collected from the creek and placed in white trays for students to examine.
 
Students examine their aquatic insects and learn that pollution in a watershed will affect the insects.
 
Students learn that, if there are fewer insects in water, there will be fewer fish in the aquatic ecosystem.

Mr. Doug Darr
Alabama Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries Division
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